Night Buddies - Adventures After Lights Out

John and Crosley: The Makings of a Dynamic Literary Friendship

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Crosley picked out John to be his Night Buddy, for starters.  There must have been a lot of reasons, but the only one Crosley mentions is middle names.  Crosley doesn’t have one, and neither does John, so they have this in common.  Crosley thinks it makes you a little sharper, too.  And hey, we know that John is really sharp, and Crosley is definitely no slouch, so maybe there’s something in it.

The two characters couldn’t help but hit it off with each other.  John doesn’t want to go to bed, so Crosley rescues him and takes him out on adventures.  Crosley for his part gets a genial and very capable partner for his “Programs.”  Sharing these adventures, the good and the bad parts, bonds the two all the more.

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John and Crosley are very different, obviously, and before I go any further, I have to confess something.  After I finished The Pineapple Cheesecake Scare, I realized I had used a device made famous by Cervantes and Mark Twain.  (When you steal, steal from the best.)  I don’t know whether Mark Twain had Sancho Panza and the Don in mind when he wrote Tom Sawyer (I promise I wasn’t thinking of any of them when writing my story), but Tom and Huck are very similar to Cervantes’ two protagonists.  There Tom is, the impractical romantic (Don Quixote), and there’s Huck, the no-nonsense, pragmatic sidekick that Tom needs in order to stay grounded (Sancho).  Two pairs of opposites who rely on and complement each other.

Exactly like John and Crosley.  John is the sensible, down-to-earth partner, and Crosley is goofy, full of wild ideas, and ready to fly off to Mars at a moment’s notice for a few pineapple cheesecakes.  And just like those other characters, they appreciate and honor each other’s differences.  They are a team that’s better than the sum of its parts.  This, and their mutual adventures (and maybe a little insomnia) are the essence of their friendship.

And having no middle names doesn’t hurt.

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Drawing Inspiration: Why Favorite Quotes Are Important for Authors

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An author’s favorite writers can often say quite a bit about where they draw inspiration for their own novels from. For instance, the Night Buddies books are full of imaginative descriptions and witty dialogue, which could be why one of Ol’ Sands’ favorite quotes comes from Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland: “‘And what is the use of a book’ thought Alice, ‘without pictures or conversation?’”

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If you want to learn more about our favorite author, take a look at some of these quotes that Ol’ Sands has declared his favorites.

“A little nonsense now and then, is cherished by the wisest men.” Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator

“Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it.” Roald Dahl

“He wrapped himself in quotations – as a beggar would enfold himself in the purple of Emperors.” Rudyard Kipling, Many Inventions

“If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man.” Mark Twain

“I hate writing, I love having written.” Dorothy Parker

We’re glad you’ve written too, Ol’ Sands!

All of these quotes have come directly from author Sands Hetherington’s Goodreads page. Make sure you go out and add him as a friend so you can keep updated with all of his favorite quotes, current reads, and of course, information about the Night Buddies series!

http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/843998.Sands_Hetherington

 

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